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MUSEUM OF APPLIED ARTS, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The building is a unique masterpiece of Art Nouveau architecture, a prime example of the endeavours of late 19th-century architecture to create a distinctive Hungarian style. The museum, founded by the Hungarian parliament in 1872, was the third museum of applied art in the world. The building, designed by Ödön LECHNER and Gyula PÁRTOS, opened to the public in 1896 as the closing event of the millennium celebrations of Hungarian state foundation. Its solutions clearly reflect Lechner´s effort to create an unmistakably Hungarian style of architecture by incorporating features of Oriental architecture and Hungarian folk arts into the dominant European style.
The magnificent green and yellow ZSOLNAY tiles of its roof and dome make the Museum of Applied Arts a popular and striking landmark on Budapest´s skyline. (Source: Szabó Virág: Szeretettel vár az Iparmüvészeti Múzeum, 2010)

www.imm.hu

© Horváth Edina, KÖH

THE CALVINIST CHURCH OF FASOR, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

A superb example of late Art Nouveau architecture designed by Aladár ÁRKAY (1913), this Church synthesises the architectural trends of the turn of the century and international influences. A central layout (in the shape of a Greek cross) influenced by American evangelist churches is representative of the new Protestant church type which had spread primarily throughout German speaking territories. The reinforced concrete structure clearly utilises the possibilities and characteristics of the new material as opposed to the more commonly employed arches which recall medieval forms. The organisation of space reveals the influence of Finnish National Romanticism, the black and gold colours are the heavily emphasized geometric ornaments suggest the presence of the Wiener Werkstätte. Forms originating from Hungarian folk art interconnect and unify, appearing - in Árkay´s unique, abstract interpretation - on the carved wooden gates, the stained-glass windows, the ceramic tiles decorating the portal, the patterns of the wall-paintings and the surrounding fence. The entire building is still intact, including the interior. Several apartments are also contained within the church building for the use of the pastors. The adjacent college was built in the same style fifteen years later. (Source: Budapest Architectural guide - 20th century, 6Bt, 1997)

www.fasor.hu

© Rácz Jolán, KÖH

GRESHAM PALACE, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The Palace of the Gresham Insurance Company (the latter Apartment and Retail Complex) was the most luxurious apartment development in the capital, built with the utmost precision and level of luxury directly upon the axis of the Lánchíd (Chain Bridge). The designers were Zsigmond QUITTNER and József VÁGÓ; the sculptural ornamentation is the work of Géza MARÓTI, Ede TELCS, Miklós LIGETI, Ede MARGÓ and Szigfrid PONGRÁCZ. The stain-glass windows of the staircase opening from sky-lit passages were designed and carried out by Miksa RÓTH. The whole building is characterised by the three dimensional, sculptural handling of novelly formed elements. (Source: Budapest Architectural guide - 20th century, 6Bt, 1997)
Today it functions as a Four Seasons Hotel.


www.fourseasons.com/budapest

© Hack Róbert, KÖH

KINDERGARTEN, ELEMENTARY-, SPECIAL PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL & RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

Sándor BAUMGARTEN, as architect of the Cultural Ministry, designed and built hundreds of school buildings throughout the country. Following his collaboration with Ödön LECHNER, Baumgarten carried out projects in the manner of his master, using sinuous and decorative brick columns and divisions.
Consequently Baumgarten became the most prolific adherent and propagator of Lechner´s architectural style. Among his most significant buildings in Budapest is the School for the Blinds (1899-1904), which represents a transition between Neo-Gothic architecture and Lechner´s style. The interior design, especially the assembly hall and its stained-glass windows which numbers amonst the largest continuous painted glass surfaces in Hungary, are certainly worth a closer look. (Source: Budapest Architectural guide - 20th century, 6Bt, 1997)

www.vakisk.hu

© Papp Tímea, KÖH

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